Basic Crochet Stitches


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As with knitting, there are only a few basic crochet stitches and you use them in many different combinations along with increases and decreases to create interesting fabrics.  For Crochet increases tend to involve forming more than one stitch in the same space and decreasing involves inserting your hook through the loops of two or more stitches int he previous row to form a single stitch.

If you are working from a crochet pattern it pays to check which country the designer comes from as not all countries use the same term for each type of stitch.  Usually I look at the instructions and then check out the photo of the finished article.  Here in Australia the stitches in the image below are called trebles but in the US and some parts of Europe they are called double crochet (dc).  

©  elm98 CanStock Photo | Old Fashioned Crochet Blanket

A pattern that uses the US stitch names is also likely to have a ton of DCs and very few Trebles. 

Basic Crochet Stitches: Step by Step Instructions (Australia/UK/NZ)

Other than the chain stitch and the slip stitch discussed on the how to crochet page, you will probably only need to use a couple of basic crochet stitches for most of the crochet projects you work on.  Even very complicated patterns will use one or more of the stitches detailed below. 

You might come across a variation (like creating a bobble by doing the first three steps of the treble crochet stitch several times and only doing the final step once) but once you are familiar with the basic crochet stitches you should be able to manage any variation you come across with relative ease.

Double Crochet (DC)


Insert your hook into the next stitch, and wrap the yarn around your hook. At this point you have the 



Pull the yarn through the first loop on the hook and wrap the yarn around the hook again.



Pull the wrapped yarn through both loops on the hook.


Repeat the three steps above to form each stitch.  At the end of the row(s) your double crochet stitches should look something like the image on the left.

Rows of double crochet produces a reasonably dense fabric.  It is also often used to finish the edge of blankets or garments.  Even if you don't plan to become a crocheter, this is a useful stitch for knitters who want an easy way to create a firm edge or to join knitted squares together.



Treble (T)


At the beginning of a row you would typically skip at least 2 stitches.  Wrap the yarn around your hook and insert it through the next stitch to be worked. Wrap the yarn around your hook again (you should have four loops on your hook at this point).



Pull the wrapped yarn through the first loop on the hook and wrap the yarn around your hook again (you should have four loops on your hook again at this point)



Pull the wrapped yarn through the first two loops on the hook and wrap the yarn around the hook again (you should have three loops on your hook at this point)

.



Pull the wrapped yarn through both loops on the hook to finish your stitch.

Repeat the three steps above to form each stitch.  At the end of the row(s) your treble crochet stitches should look something like the image on the left.


Half Treble (HT)

To do a half treble you follow the instructions above and complete the first and second steps.  For the third and final step of the half treble you pull the yarn through all of the stitches on the hook rather than just the first two.


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