Karen

by K. Honor
(Colorado Springs, CO, U.S.A.)

I have a pattern that calls for 7 skeins of 100 gr yarn.

The pattern is Bernat Book 295 from 1982. Style #990-295.

It does not mention the amount yardage required.
The gauge is 6 sts = one inch in pattern stitch

I purchased five skeins of 200g yarn @ 341 yards called Marble Chunky.
By James C Brett

I knitted a swatch with size 7 needles and there is 6 stitches horizontally.

However the vertical is 8 stitches. I have various size needles available.

I get a little confused because some skeins say
100g and the other skeins say 200gr. Without the
yardage listed on package

I realize that yarns have different plys and different diameters. And that can make a difference in the finished garment.

Could you tell me if I have enough yarn to complete my project? And explain the difference listed on the Skeins of yarn.

If I have enough yarn would the garment turn out if I kept the horizontal gauge and measured for the length?

YOUR ANSWER


I am not familiar with either the pattern or the two different yarns you have mentioned in your question so I cannot answer your question in a definitive way.

If the composition of the two yarns is similar - meaning that they are made of the same fibers, the yardage in 200 gram ball should be approx twice the length of the 100 gram balls. But if the fibers are different - for example if one is wool and the other is a man made fiber, then the weights would be different enough for the yardage to be completely different.

As you have 5 x 200 grams for a pattern that uses 7 x 100 grams you are probably pretty safe.

As for the difference in the tension swatch, it is generally better to go with the number of stitches across and adjust for the height.

But having said that if your pattern has a lot of shaping, at the armhole for example, and the number of rows per 10 cm (or 4 inches) is significantly different, you may have issues with the shaping taking up too much of the length before the next lot of shaping.


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